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More Kaspa (KAS) FPGA and ASIC Miners are Coming on the Market

0


10
Apr
2023

The Osprey Electronics E300 14 GH/s kHeavyHash miner might have been the first FPGA miner on the market for KASPA, but it apparently won’t be the only one with more FPGA and ASIC miners for KAS incoming. The E300 was initially priced at $4999 USD and is currently available at $5199 USD with end of May delivery with 400-500 Watts of power usage, but it seems that the device is now facing competition with the MultMiner M2 FPGA miner (apparently a rebranded Blackminer FPGA from HashAltCoin with kHeavyHash support) offering a hashrate of 8 GH/s at 1 kW or 10.5 GH/s at 1.3 kW as well as DigyByte, Tellor, Qitmeer and Kadena support with a price of $2000+ USD. The other new option is apparently called SuperScalar K10 kHeavyHash ASIC miner that promises 30 GH/s hashrate at 1700W of power usage with a price of around $8500-$10000 USD.

All of these FPGA and ASIC miners for KASPA (KAS) are quite expensive and although they do outperform the GPUs that most of us use for mining KAS at the moment, they still might not be a good investment and the reason for that is pretty simple – KASPA (KAS) is the only coin that currently uses the kHeavyHash algorithm and its block reward is decreasing steadily each month (check the emission curve for details) and constantly rising hashrate and difficulty. So, going for a very expensive kHeavyHash ASIC miner that cannot mine anything else is very risky and can easily get you to lose money, it is much wiser to invest what you would pay for the hardware to buy KAS instead, that could turn out to be a much better investment. The situation with FPGAs is a bit better as they could in theory be reprogrammed to mine other algorithms and coins, but there is no guaranteed that they will be, so still quite risky and again might be a better choice to go for directly investing in KAS than to buy FPGA or ASIC miner to mine it with it.

Now, if you happen to have an old Blackminer F1, F1mini, F1+, F1mini+, F1-Ultra or an F2 purchased back in the day from HashAltCoin, then you might want to pay attention here as these got a firmware update to support KASPA (KAS), although the bitstream to support the kHeavyHash algorithm is strangely called “Kasper Bit”. Head on to HashAltCoin’s support section to download the new firmware updates for these devices that will bring you KAS support and depending on the hardware you have you might be lucky to get a “free” MultMiner M2 capabilities. Surely it will be a good enough reason to revive these miners from the dead even if it is just a small mini that is not that much powerful it could still mine you some Kaspa coins at profit due to the great power efficiency of these FPGAs.

Do note however that you might need to use proxy or a VPN if you are based on USA (maybe some other countries as well) in order to access HashAltcoin’s official website and be able to download the firmware updates for the Blackminer!!!

To the HashAltcoin Support Center with KAS bitstream updates for Blackminer FPGA miners…

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